Potassium Iodide

Potassium Iodide

Governments world-wide are now stockpiling potassium iodide (KI). Amongst them are Japan, Canada, Britain, France, Germany, Poland, Switzerland, Denmark, Norway, Austria, Sweden, etc., but not the U.S. After Three Mile Island and Chernobyl, all available potassium iodide supplies disappeared for months, almost overnight. With news of the recent nuclear accident in Tokaimura, Japan and continuing reports of the growing numbers of thyroid cancers amongst young Chernobyl victims, who were not issued potassium iodide, Americans are increasingly seeking out their own sources for this radiation protection medicine.

The CDC recommends using iodine to prevent injury form radioactive iodine fallout.  Adults and women who are breastfeeding should take 130mg of potassium iodide.   Children who are between 3 and 18 years of age should take 65mg of potassium iodide.  Children who are adult size should take the adult dose.  Infants and children between 1 month and 3 years of age should take 32mg of potassium iodide. Newborns from birth to one month of age should be given 16mg of potassium iodide. 

Protecting Against Radioiodine

If you’re reading this and you live near a nuclear power plant you may already be familiar with potassium iodide (KI). Since the incident at Chernobyl, nearly twenty years ago, scientists have learned a great deal about the effects radiation poisoning can have on people.

A person exposed to “fallout” can suffer from a myriad list of ailments, among them thyroid cancer. Thyroid cancer, due to radiation poisoning, is caused by the uptake (through inhalation or ingestion) of radioiodine (a radioactive isotope of iodine). The treatment is practical enough but a few things should be explained before going on. For instance . . .

Treatments for Nuclear Contamination   Iodine – Glutathione – Natural Chelation – Clay – Sodium Bicarbonate (Baking Soda
The kidneys are usually the first organs to show chemical damage upon uranium exposure. Old military manuals suggest doses or infusions of sodium bicarbonate to help alkalinize the urine if this happens. This makes the uranyl ion less kidney-toxic and promotes excretion of the nontoxic uranium-carbonate complex. The oral administration of sodium bicarbonate diminishes the severity of the changes produced by uranium in the kidneys. So useful and strong is sodium bicarbonate that at Los Alamos National Laboratory in New Mexico, researcher Don York has used baking soda to clean soil contaminated with uranium. Sodium bicarbonate binds with uranium, separating it from the dirt; so far, York has removed as much as 92 percent of the uranium from contaminated soil samples. I started writing about baking soda after discovering that the United States Army recommends the use of bicarbonate to protect the kidneys from radiation damage. learn more…

Protecting the Thyroid Gland Against Radiation Fallout (Radioiodine) with Potassium Iodide

Glutathione and Thyroid Health
Glutathione is a master antioxidant, an important line of defense against diseases, toxins, viruses, pollutants, radiation and oxidative stress. Low glutathione levels are linked to diseases such as Cancer, Multiple Sclerosis, AIDS, Alzheimer’s, Parkinson’s, Atherosclerosis, pregnancy complications, male infertility and Cataracts. A Glutathione deficiency can cause a lack of coordination, mental disorders, tremors, and difficulty maintaining balance. Glutathione is continuously defending our body against attacks from disease, toxins, poisons, viruses, pollutants, radiation and oxidative stress. Without Glutathione our liver would soon become overwhelmed with the accumulation of toxins, resulting in organ failure and death.

Compounds from rosemary fight against mutagenic effects of radiation

In two separate studies, scientists in Spain found that nothing fights radiation damage to micronuclei like a simple garden herb known as rosemary. They noted that ionizing radiation causes the massive generation of free radicals that induce cellular DNA damage. They studied the protective effects of several compounds against gamma ray induced chromosomal damage in micronuclei testing by adding various compounds to human blood before and after irradiation. When the compounds were added after gamma-irradiation treatment, the protective effects relied not on scavenging ability, but on activity against free radicals already present in the cells, such as lipoperoxy radicals which are mainly responsible for continuous chromosomal oxidative damage.

The fact that carnosic acid and carnosol found in rosemary are fat soluble allows them to provide highly asignificant protective anti-mutagenic activity. Even the most powerful water-soluble antioxidants lack the capacity to protect against gamma ray induced damage. This study can be found in the British Journal of Radiology, February 2 edition.

In their second study, the generation of radiation induced cellular DNA damage to skin from free radicals was the focus. The researchers sought to demonstrate that rosmarinic acid from rosemary would act as a photo-protector both by acting as a scavenger of free radicals and as an inducer of the body’s own endogenous defense mechanisms by regulating tyrosinase activity and stimulating melanin production. They found that formulation of toxic malonyldialdehyde was delayed by the use of rosmarinic acid, and the protection factor was 3.34 times greater than for other compounds studied, as measured in micronucleus testing. In vivo testing showed the capacity of orally administered rosmarinic acid to inhibit skin alterations as a result of UV radiation exposure. This study was reported in the February edition of Food and Chemical Toxicology.

MODIFILAN was developed in Russia by a group of scientists who worked in the State Rehabilitation Institute, where victims of the Chernobyl nuclear catastrophe underwent treatment. The healing qualities of seaweed had been known for centuries, so the Russian government instructed scientists to find an effective and powerful remedy for the radiation poisoning of that particular population. After trying out various forms of algae, one type yielded the best scientific data for this purpose. It was the brown seaweed known as Laminaria japonica, which grows wild in the northern Pacific Ocean off the coast of uninhabited islands far to the east of Russia, known as the Kurils

 

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